Serena Houlihan - September 30, 2020

The Lost Art of the Handwritten Note

Handwritten note

Ihave always loved writing cards, letters and collecting stationary. Ever since elementary school, I've kept a healthy stockpile of notecards, pads, journals -- you name it -- close by in my closet. I've just always loved the feel of a pen in my hand and how my ideas flow more easily with pen-to-paper than fingers-to-keyboard.

The act of writing to someone is an incredibly human way to connect. In a world of increasing isolation, a handwritten note shows the recipient how much you care about them. It's easy to dash off a text or an email. We all do hundreds of times a day. But to sit down and compose a thoughtful message to a loved one? And then search for a stamp and  their mailing address -- that takes time! And time equals love in this busy, chaotic world. 

We are craving human connection during these days of uncertainty, isolation and general upheaval. As this new era of social distancing drags on, many of us are realizing how special and meaningful it is to receive a letter or card in the mail. Martha Stewart Living is calling upon us to "reclaim this lost art" of letter writing. The Washington Post recently reported on research that suggests handwritten letters can help improve a loved one's mental state. 

Le Wren's mission is to encourage human connection, support healing and help you show your loved one how much you care. So it's no coincidence that every Le Wren gift box includes a handwritten note -- from you. That simple touch is just one way we help you connect to your friends and loved ones. And isn't that what we all need right now?

Want to take action today? A very simple first step: pick up a pen and write a note to a loved one. Don't overthink it; write it, stamp it, and send it.

Let the words, and emotion, flow. I think you'll be surprised how easy it can be, and how much it means to the person who receives it. 

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